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20130121
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to be a bit of a struggle, and i think it's all about the guidance going forward. you know, the economy, you know, two steps forward, one step back, and corporate america can't carry the water. it will be difficult for the market, and priced pretty much to perfection at the current level with popular averages, not leaving room for disappointment. liz: hate one step forward, two back -- >> no, the other way. liz: either way, not moving fast. is that at a decent clip? >> actually, that's something we talked about last week on the show, and what we're looking at, again, south africa, right now, the mining situation is getting worse and worse, and -- liz: labor issues? >> the strikes, strikes, labor issues, and a threat that some of the major companies are shutting down the mines until they resolve this. we'll have a shortage in these areas, and, also, seeing platinum taking a bit of a piggy back ride up. it's at the 1680s mirroring where gold is now. silver is joining along for the ride. we're seeing a lot happening with the precious metals. liz: platinum is higher than gold for the first time
will be the gdp numbers. and that's when we find out what kind of economy we've got in the fourth quarter of last year. that will point towards how we're going to do in 2013. i suspect that that could move the market. all right. the bell is ringing, and as you know by now, if you're a regular "varney & company" viewer when the bell stops ringing, they start trading and we're expecting, what are we expecting? we're looking for a pretty flat market and i hate to keep saying this, but a pretty flat market. the dow closed yesterday around 13,500 and we're opening down 3 points at 13504. the opening trend is down. i looked at the futures and you can expect maybe a 40 or 50 point loss in the early going. no big negative that's out there, just a general drift away from 13-5 on the dow. we are in fact, just a couple of hours away from facebook's big announcement. that comes at one o'clock eastern. so, nicole, i am told that the big news could be a new search engine, could be. i'm not going to speculate on that, but i want to know where the stock opens this morning. >> that would be very big news and the
is the likelihood the u.s. economy could have a stronger here than economists were expecting? >> and excellent question. i think the risks are just as good on the outside or they are on the downside. there is a lot of growing momentum in the u.s. economy. all of this in then you have the energy boom in the whole shale thing helping in that industry and related industries. there are a lot of bright spots in the u.s. you know, the guys in washington do not mock it up, we have a good shot. melissa: we have breaking news right now. i want to point you to the shares of facebook. down $0.60. that is good for almost 2%. we have this meeting going on right now. it is a major reversal for the stock. we are trying to get more details out of this meeting. we will have rob enderle on at the end to talk about it. shibani: i am following a couple of live logs on the event. the three pillars of facebook. when he unveiled today is his 23 pillar which is being called graph search. it is a graphical search. it is not a web search. that is one of the reasons we are seeing a selloff of facebook shares. again, wha
in the second half of this year, we could start seeing some economies get traction again. of course, some of the very badly hit economies like greece, it will take longer. but europe i think should improve. >> the chairman and ceo of mercedes-benz joining us first on cnbc. the e-class rollout here earlier today. i'm not sure that i have ever seen an unveiling with as many people as were jammed in here to the mercedes stand today here in detroit. back to you. >> that is a big deal, phil. you've seen your share of unveilings, that's for sure. phil lebeau in treat today. one food company on the move, let's get to kayla tausche who is manning the market flash desk. >> watching flowers foods. that's a southern food company, flo. about $4 billion in market cap, that stock up more than 6% hitting an all-time high on its first trading day after signing an agreement to acquire the majority of the bread businesses from hostess brands. that includes wonder bread. of course we're still waiting for some of the other bidders for some of the other units to be announced. right now flowers is the bid to b
did. the fact is we still have a good fundamental backdrop. the economy is expanding. it's not contracting or growing. value sheets are strong and valuations are very attractive so what is there not to like? >> you're our resident skeptic today, and i would point not to the normal averages that we quote every day, but look at the dow transportation average which could close at an all-time high today. the transportation companies, often a leading indicator for the economy. if they are doing well. chances are the economy is going to get better. wouldn't that make you want to buy stocks right now. >> it does. we're not -- we're actually a little bit more bullish, esespecially the first six months of the year. we still are expecting slow growth, commodities where we're shorting assets, but in terms of u.s. and in terms of international, we do expect growth, and we are excited about what's happening, but later on in the year i think it's going to be another story. >> what do you mean by that, later on in the year? what's going to be the upset later on in the year? >> there's a
that is indeed worrisome. however, we are seeing some pretty good signs in the economy right now, so we're hopefully optimistic that they'll continue. and last thing anybody who's bet against america has proved it's a losing bet in the past. we're very bullish on this country. >> steve, thanks so much for your time. thank you for joining us first on cnbc. >> thank you. >>> interesting debate. meantime, goldman sachs making waves with the bonus pay joits. we'll get that in a moment. after the break, david faber's exclusive with mel karmazin. he's here to give us his very first interview since stepping down as the ceo of sirius xm. we're back in a couple of minutes. mine was earned in djibouti, africa, 2004. the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto-insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to s
to hold wall street and the big banks accountable and protect consumer and the u.s. economy. >> after all we have been through, i don't believe that rolling back regulations on wall street will help the small businesswoman expand or the laid off construction worker keep his home. >> reporter: republicans in congress want to cut obama era and even bush era regulations which they dismiss as unnecessary red tape. two laws are at issue here. dodd-frank and sarbanes-oxley. dodd-frank is the signature financial reform of president obama's first term. it set up the consumer financial protection bureau to write new rules to prevent fraud and unfair lending practices and put limits on banks deemed too big to fail by monitoring threats and stopping another financial crisis. sarbanes-oxley was a response to a different crisis, the enron accounting scandal of the early 2000s. it set up stricter accounting rules for companies of all sizes. critics say it drives up costs for smaller businesses and restricts growth. what does it mean for small businesss? for the big banks? well, we spoke to a community
the american economy. >> also, need to tell you the president did speak about his gun violence effort. he's had the package put together by the vice president is on his desk today. and he will talk about it a little later on this week. want to bring in two people here, ali velshi with me from new york, and gloria borger there in our nation's capital, to you both welcome. ali, it has been more than a year since that whole previous debt limit debacle. and i know you are saying, especially comparing this to what we just saw on new year's day with the fiscal cliff, this is going to be much, much worse, much bigger deal. talk to me about what we're debating or as the president puts it not debating? >> what we're debating or not debating is the idea that the debt ceiling in the united states is a very unusual tool, only one other country has it. and it is because what used to happen is whenever the government needed to spend money, particularly when you're in a deficit, the treasury of the united states would have to go out and issue bonds in order to get cash to pay for it. and that was just a cumbe
economy, is signaling they're on board, announcing today they'll spend $50 billion over ten years on new products all made right here at home. so, how many jobs could that be? our made in america captain is back, david muir, on the case. david? >> reporter: that's right, diane. walmart now the latest and largest retailer to say, in essence, wait a minute. while the math of making things overseas made a lot of sense, it doesn't always add up now. and economists arguing their move today was about far more than just p.r. tonight, walmart with that bold promise. buying an additional $50 billion in goods to sell, made in america over the next decade. it comes after years of criticism that walmart doesn't pay enough in wages and that the company sells too many products overseas. critics arguing that's how they keep their prices so low. we asked walmart shoppers to check the labels today. it didn't take long. maria small and her new blouse -- >> made in china. >> reporter: this couple and their new stool. >> made in china. >> reporter: but today, walmart u.s. was adamant, saying two-thirds of w
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9